Common Central Air Conditioning Terminology Explained

When your heating, ventilation, and air conditioning technician comes to service or repair your system, do you ever struggle to understand some of the words they use? Well, don’t fret – here are some standard HVAC terms explained.

Air Handler

The air handler is what regulates and circulates the conditioned air throughout your home. When paired with an air conditioner it circulates both cool and hot air, depending on the time of year. This looks like a large metal box that contains a blower, indoor evaporator coil, and other heating and cooling elements, which are connected to the ductwork.

Outdoor Condenser

The condenser is located outside of your home. It is responsible for releasing heat, using its compressor, condenser coil, and condenser fan motor.

Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER)

The SEER ratio measures the efficiency of your air conditioner. The higher the rating, the more efficient it is. Specifically, it compares the ratio of cooling capacity to the wattage input.

Evaporator Coil

This can be found on top of the furnace. Its function is to extract and absorb the heat from the air in your house using refrigerant.

Heat Exchanger

Located inside the furnace, the heat exchanger sends heat out into the air, which is then dispersed throughout your home.

MERV Rating

Known as the Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value, this is a rating that measures the efficiency of air filters. A higher MERV rating indicates a more efficient filter that will have smaller holes to prevent particles from passing through.

Refrigerant

A chemical that produces a cooling effect, which is used in your air conditioner.

Thermostat

This handy device helps you maintain optimal temperature in your home by monitoring both the temperature and humidity in order to adjust the heating or cooling system when necessary. It automatically regulates these to keep your internal temperature comfortable.

Heat Recovery Ventilator (HRV)

This is a device that recirculates air inside your home with fresh, filtered, outdoor air.

There you have some of the most common HVAC terminology explained. So next time, you can get a better understanding of what’s happening with your system.

Are you interested in upgrading your current central air conditioning system or perhaps installing your home’s first unit? Contact us today!